The Reader Presents: A Night of Queer Scottish Fiction

 

On February 16th, join us for an evening of queer feminist fairytales, murderous families, and Scottish folklore with two of Scotland’s most exciting writers, special guests Kirsty Logan and Mary Paulson-Ellis, chaired by our very own Jane Flett.

Date: Sunday, February 16th 2020

Time: Doors at 7, readings from 8

Location: The.Word.Berlin (Willmanndamm 4)

Entry: Free / Donations welcome

Fresh from this year’s British Council Germany Literature Seminar in Hamburg, we’re delighted to host the incredible KIRSTY LOGAN and MARY PAULSON-ELLIS for a night of readings and conversation.

KIRSTY LOGAN writes queer fairytale retellings and feminist horror stories, which have drawn comparisons to Angela Carter and praise from writers such as Ursula K. LeGuin and Roxane Gay.

MARY PAULSON-ELLIS likes to wander in graveyards and write novels about the overlooked; she was named by Val McDermid as one of the most compelling LGBTQI+ writers working today.

The evening will be chaired by our own JANE FLETT, whose Scottish folklore-inspired novella was one of the recipients of the Berlin Senate stipend for non-German literature this year.

 

MORE ABOUT THE AUTHORS:

 

Kirsty Logan is a professional daydreamer. She is the author of two novels, The Gloaming and The Gracekeepers, and three story collections, Things We Say in the Dark, A Portable Shelter and The Rental Heart & Other Fairytales. She lives in Glasgow with her wife and their rescue dog. She has tattooed toes.

“Kirsty Logan is an exquisite writer…if you want to be captivated, if you want to be utterly taken, reach for this book and don’t let go.” – Roxane Gay

 

Mary Paulson-Ellis lives in Edinburgh, Scotland where she writes about the world of those who die with no apparent next of kin. She is the author of two novels: The Other Mrs Walker, a Times bestseller and Waterstones Scottish Book of the Year and The Inheritance of Solomon Farthing, a Times and Sunday Times Crime Club pick.

“Firmly rooted both in the secret lives of Edinburgh and what she calls ‘the murderous side of family life – the dark, the quirky and the strange.’” – Val McDermid

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